Judy Garland’s Daughter Lorna Luft Diagnosed With Brain Tumor After Backstage Collapse



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Singer Lorna Luft, the daughter of Judy Garland and half-sister of Liza Minnelli (above right), has been diagnosed with a brain tumor after she collapsed backstage at a concert in London, Associated Press reported.
The singer’s representative, Victoria Varela, told TheWrap’s via email that Luft, 65, collapsed backstage Friday night following the second of her four sold out shows at London’s iconic Pizza Express Jazz Club.
Luft’s husband, Colin Freeman, had been concerned that she was forgetting lyrics and a monologue during her performance. She was rushed to London’s Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, where she was given an initial diagnosis of a brain tumor and is undergoing additional tests, Varela said.
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“Further information will be available following additional medical tests and examination,” Valera said.
An Emmy-winning TV producer and Broadway star, Luft was diagnosed with breast cancer more than six years. She is currently in remission.

It was 77 years ago that a cyclone whisked Dorothy from her drab, sepia tone life in Kansas to the Technicolor land of little people, bewitched poppy fields and flying monkeys. You may know the story well, but here are a few things about “The Wizard of Oz” that might take you by surprise.
MGM

Judy Garland had a difficult time shaking the giggles after the Lion burst into tears when Dorothy smacked him for scaring Toto. After numerous takes, you can spot her holding back a grin in what made it to the big screen.
MGM

Continuity issues arose during filming, including one that slipped through the cracks and made it into the final film. We’re talking about Dorothy’s hair length in the scene where she first encounters the Scarecrow. It’s short, it’s long, it’s short again.
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The purple, red and yellow Horse of a Different Color was created with a Jell-O-based tint that wouldn’t be harmful to the animals. You can spot the purple horse trying to lick it off its chops.
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Margaret Pellegrini was only 16 years old when she played one of the Flowerpot Munchkins. She told a Glendale news station that she was paid $50 a week, which was less than what Toto made. “He got $125 a week!”
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The Cowardly Lion’s costume weighed almost 100 pounds and was made with real lion pelts. His hefty tail was attached to a square block inside the Lion’s backside.” You can see it as he and the Tin Man scale the cliff to the Witch’s castle.
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Toto — whose real name was Terry — was a little on the jittery side when it came to the special effects. You can see the terrier take off running when the Tin Man gave his hat a honk during his dance number.
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Victor Fleming — who also directed “Gone With the Wind” the same year — had little patience for fun on the set. When Garland could stop laughing during a scene, Fleming slapped her and ordered her to “Go in there and work.”
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The Lion needed courage, but judging by the lyrics to “King of the Forrest,” he could probably use a brain, too. In it, he sings “What makes the Sphinx the Seventh Wonder?” The thing is, the Sphinx isn’t one of the Seven Wonder’s of the World.
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Actress Clara Blandick will always be best remembered as Auntie Em. Sadly, Blandick took her own life with an overdose of sleeping pills and a plastic bag pulled tightly over her head.
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When the Wicked Witch vanished from Munchkinland in a cloud of red smoke and a burst of flames, her portrayer, Margaret Hamilton, was badly burned as she dropped through the trap door. Her green makeup was not fireproof.
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In honor of Judy Garland’s birthday, here are a few bloopers, wardrobe malfunctions and behind-the-scenes secrets of the 1939 classic

It was 77 years ago that a cyclone whisked Dorothy from her drab, sepia tone life in Kansas to the Technicolor land of little people, bewitched poppy fields and flying monkeys. You may know the story well, but here are a few things about “The Wizard of Oz” that might take you by surprise.

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