‘Hamilton’ Star Cast as Judas in NBC’s ‘Jesus Christ Superstar Live’



NBC

NBC’s “Jesus Christ Superstar Live” production has found its Judas.
“Hamilton” star and two-time Tony nominee Brandon Victor Dixon will play Jesus’ betrayer in the Easter Sunday live musical, the network said on Thursday. Dixon portrayed Aaron Burr in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s star-making play.
Dixon joins John Legend as Jesus, Sara Bareilles as Mary Magdalene, Alice Cooper as King Herod, Ben Daniels as Pontius Pilate, Norm Lewis as Caiaphas, Jason Tam as Peter, Jin Ha as Annas, and Erik Gronwall as Simon Zealotes.
The original musical debuted on stage in 1971, and follows the final week of Jesus’ life. The original musical starred Jeff Fenholt as Jesus and Ben Vereen as Judas, and earned five Tony nominations. Vereen was nominated for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical, and Lloyd Webber won a Drama Desk Award for Most Promising Composer.
NBC’s production will be directed by David Leveaux. The show will be filmed live in front of an audience at the Marcy Armory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, N.Y.
“Jesus Christ Superstar Live” will air Easter Sunday, April 1 at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

The EGOT — an acronym for Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony — is the greatest honor in entertainment. These stars are (or were) close to achieving it.

Henry Fonda, actor (1905-82)Grammy: Best Spoken Word Album, “Great Documents” (1977)Oscar: Best Actor, “On Golden Pond” (1981)Tony: Best Actor, “Mister Roberts” (1948); Best Actor, “Clarence Darrow” (1975)

Elton John, composer and musician (1947-)Grammy: Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group, “That’s What Friends Are For” (1986); Best Instrumental Composition, “Basque” (1991); Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” (1994); Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, “Candle in the Wind” (1997); Best Show Album, “Aida” (2000)Oscar: Best Original Son, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” from “The Lion King” (1994)Tony: Best Score, “Aida” (2000)

Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist and producer (1895-1960)Grammy: Best Original Cast Album, “The Sound of Music” (1960)Oscar: Best Original Song, “The Last Time I Saw Paris” from “Lady Be Good” (1941); “It Might As Well Be Spring” from “State Fair” (1945)Tony: Three awards for “South Pacific” (1950); Best Musical, “The King and I” (1952); Best Musical, “The Sound of Music” (1960)

Stephen Sondheim, composer and lyricist (1930-)Grammy: Best Show Album, “Company” (1970); Best Show Album, “A Little Night Music” (1973); Song of the Year, “Send in the Clowns” (1975); Best Show Album, “Sweeney Todd” (1979); Best Show Album, “Sunday in the Park With George” (1984); Best Cast Show Album, “Into the Woods” (1988); Best Show Album, “Passion” (1994); Oscar: Best Original Song, “Sooner Or Later (I Always Get My Man)” from “Dick Tracy” (1990)Tony: Best Musical, “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” (1963); Best Score and Best Lyrics, “Company” (1971); Best Score, “Follies” (1972); Best Score, “A Little Night Music” (1973); Best Score, “Sweeney Todd” (1979); Best Score, “Into the Woods” (1988); Best Score, “Passion” (1994)

Alan Jay Lerner, lyricist and writer (1918-86)Grammy: Best Original Cast Album, “On a Clear Day” (1965)Oscar: Best Original Screenplay, “An American in Paris” (1951); Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Song, “Gigi” (1958)Tony: Best Musical, “My Fair Lady” (1957); Best Original Score, “Gigi” (1974)

Andrew Lloyd Webber, composer (1948-)Grammy: Best Cast Album, “Evita” (1980); Best Cast Album, “Cats” (1983); Best Contemporary Composition, “Lloyd Webber: Requiem” (1985)Oscar: Best Original Song, “You Must Love Me” from “Evita” (1986)Tony: Best Score, “Evita” (1980); Best Score, “Cats” (1983); Best Score, “Sunset Boulevard” (1995)

Tim Rice, lyricist (1944-)Grammy: Best Cast Album, “Evita” (1980); Song of the Year and Song for Film or TV, “A Whole New World” (1993); Best Album for Children, “Aladdin” (1993); Best Cast Album, “Aida” (2000)Oscar: Best Original Song, “A Whole New World” from “Aladdin” (1992); “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” from “The Lion King” (1994); “You Must Love Me” from “Evita” (1996)Tony: Best Book and Best Score, “Evita” (1980); Best Score, “Aida” (2000)

Frank Loesser, composer (1910-69)Grammy: Best Cast Album, “How to Succeed…” (1961);Oscar: Best Song, “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” from “Neptune’s Daughter” (1949)Tony: Best Musical, “Guys and Dolls” (1951); Best Musical, “How to Succeed…” (1962)

Alan Menken, composer (1949-)Grammy: Best Recording for Children and Song for TV or Film, “The Little Mermaid” (1990); Best Recording for Children, Song for TV or Film, Instrumental for TV or Film, “Beauty and the Beast” (1992); Song of the Year, “A Whole New World,” Best Recording for Children, Song for TV or Film, Instrumental for TV or Film, “Aladdin” (1993); Best Song for TV or Film, “Colors of the Wind” (1995); Best Song for Visual Medium, “I See the Light” (2011)Oscar: Best Score and Song, “The Little Mermaid” (1989); Best Score and Song, “Beauty and the Beast” (1991); Best Score and Song, “Aladdin” (1992); Best Score and Song, “Pocahontas” (1995)Tony: Best Score, “Newsies” (2012)

Jule Styne, composer and songwriter (1905-94)Grammy: Best Cast Album, “Funny Girl” (1964)Oscar: Best Song, “Three Coins in the Fountain” (1954)Tony: Best Musical and Best Score, “Hallelujah Baby” (1968)

John Legend, songwriter and producer (1978-)Grammy: Best New Artist (2005); Best R&B Album, “Get Lifted” (2005); Best R&B Vocal, “Ordinary People” (2005); Best Male R&B Vocal, “Heaven” (2006); Best R&B Duo or Group, “Family Affair” (2006); Best R&B Vocal or Group, “Stay With Me by the Sea” (2008); Best R&B Album, “Wake Up!” (2010); Best R&B Song, “Shine” (2010); Best R&B Vocal, “Hang On in There” (2010); Best Song Written for Visual Medium, “Glory” (2015)Oscar: Best Original Song, “Glory” from “Selma (2014)Tony: Producer of Best Play Revival, “August Wilson’s Jitney” (2017)

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A select group of entertainers can round out their trophy cases with a competitive win from the Television Academy

The EGOT — an acronym for Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony — is the greatest honor in entertainment. These stars are (or were) close to achieving it.

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