‘Real Time’: Vicente Fox Says School Shootings Are a By-Product of Racism



Former president of Mexico, Vicente Fox, says that tragedies like the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, is a by-product of bigotry and racism, particularly the sort that comes out of President Donald Trump’s mouth.
Fox was the mid-show guest on Friday’s episode of “Real Time With Bill Maher” and, right off the bat, they discussed the shooting that killed 17 people. Mentioning the “very sad event in Florida,” Fox said that “when you speak out of the White House this aggressive violent language, [when] you discriminate, when you’re a racist, that’s what you get.”
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Fox, who served as president of Mexico from 2000-2006, has become an unlikely social media celebrity in the era of Trump thanks to his combative, often profane responses to the POTUS’ repeated demand that Mexico pay for a wall along the U.S./Mexico border. “You can use my words: We’ll never pay for that f—ing wall,” Fox notably said live on CNN in August 2017.
He struck a more calming tone on “Real Time,” saying that “we need harmony. We need love, we need happy communities. And those concepts don’t come out of his mouth.”
That didn’t stop Maher from trying to get an f-bomb out of Fox by mentioning the wall. “So, will you pay that in a lump sum or–?” Maher asked.
Fox laughed and answered, “Do I have to repeat myself?”

While we haven’t seen a Latino superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe yet, there are plenty of comic-book heroes ready to make the move to the big screen. Here are some of the biggest Latino superheroes.

Marvel made waves in 2011 when Miles Morales replaced Peter Parker as Spider-Man in the alternate Ultimate Universe. After moving to Marvel’s main universe, Miles teamed up with Peter and became the new protector of New York.
Marvel

White Tiger was the first Puerto Rican superhero and has been played by both men and women. The current White Tiger, Ava Ayala, is played by the sister of the original White Tiger, Hector Ayala.
Marvel

A mutant from Rio de Janeiro, Roberto da Costa was introduced to the X-Men mythos in 1982 in “The New Mutants.” He took on the name Sunspot, based off his ability to absorb solar energy and use it to supercharge his body.
Marvel

Anya Corazon arrived in the Marvel Universe as Arana, and has since changed her name to Spider-Girl. She’s teamed up with Peter Parker and other incarnations of Spider-Man in the course of the series.
Marvel

In the DC Universe, Catalina Flores, a.k.a. Tarantula, was an antihero in the “Nightwing” series who had an extremely turbulent relationship with Dick Grayson.
DC

Acrata is a Mexican superhero who has the ability to teleport in the shadows. She has teamed up with Superman in DC’s comics and has appeared on the TV show “Smallville.”
DC

Also in the DC Universe, former Gotham City detective Renee Montoya became The Question in 2006, taking the mantle of the faceless investigator from Vic Sage. She’s also a LGBT superhero, and had a relationship with Batwoman.
DC

In 2014, Marvel’s Ghost Rider was reimagined as an East L.A. teen named Robbie Reyes, who becomes possessed with a vengeful spirit as he takes on the criminal underworld.
Marvel

The son of a human mother and the android Ultron, Victor Mancha is a cyborg with electromagnetic powers. He’s currently fighting alongside the likes of Ant-Man and Vision.
Marvel

Inspired by Batman and Mexican luchadors like El Santo, El Gato Negro is a hero from South Texas who fights villains on the street and in the ring. The current El Gato Negro is the grandson of the original, and spends time as a social worker when not wearing the mask. He stars in Mexico’s Azteca Comics.
Azteca Comics

Originally created back in 1941, Miss America was reintroduced to the Marvel universe in 2011 as an LGBT Latina named America Chavez. The new Miss America has been a part of the Young Avengers and Ultimates and has the ability to travel across Marvel’s multiverse.
Marvel

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Latino superheroes include classic heroes and LGBT heroines

While we haven’t seen a Latino superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe yet, there are plenty of comic-book heroes ready to make the move to the big screen. Here are some of the biggest Latino superheroes.

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