California Assemblywoman at Center of #MeToo on Unpaid Leave During Sexual Misconduct Probe



California Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia has “done the right thing” by immediately stepping down while under investigation for sexual misconduct, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party said on Friday afternoon.
Garcia is “voluntarily taking an immediate unpaid leave,” according to a statement from Party Chair Mark Gonzalez, issued one day after multiple men accused Garcia of inappropriate behavior, including groping a 25-year-old aide in 2014.
Only two months ago, the 38-year-old assemblywoman — who represents segments of south-east Los Angeles — was featured in a Time Magazine spread championing the “silence breakers” that have spoken out against sexual harassment.
“Of the many things the #MeToo movement has called for, one is that all accusations must be taken seriously, no matter the circumstance,” Gonzalez said. “Following the accusations of sexual harassment, Assemblymember Garcia has done the right thing by stepping aside from her position in order to let the investigation be fully completed without any interruption. We are grateful that all parties concerned are being fully cooperative, and we expect everyone to remain cooperative until the investigation is completed.”
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Daniel Fierro claimed to Politico on Thursday that the assemblywoman “squeezed his buttocks and attempted to touch his crotch” after an annual softball game. Fierro said he didn’t report the incident at first, but after mentioning it to a former boss, has been referred to the Assembly Rules Committee. The incident is currently under investigation.
A Sacramento lobbyist also claimed she made a pass at him: “She came back and was whispering real close and I could smell the booze and see she was pretty far gone,” the man told Politico. “She looked at me for a second and said, ‘I’ve set a goal for myself to f– you.’”

The turnover in the Trump administration continues.
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Michael Flynn  
Michael Flynn resigned in February 2017 as President Trump’s national security adviser after less than a month in the position.
The move came after Flynn admitted he gave “incomplete information” about a call he had with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. last December regarding sanctions against Russia, The New York Times reported, and that he misled Vice President Mike Pence and other top White House officials about the conversation.
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Preet Bharara 
Months after getting personal assurance from the president that he would remain in his job as a top federal prosecutor, Bharara was asked to submit his resignation in March 2017.
“Had I not been fired, and had Donald Trump continued to cultivate a direct personal relationship with me, it’s my strong belief at some point, given the history, the president of the United States would’ve asked me to do something inappropriate,” Bharara said on his podcast.
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James Comey 
President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey in May 2017 over his handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails.
Trump’s decision was based on the recommendation of both Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, according to Spicer.

Michael Dubke 
Michael Dubke, the first communications director in the Trump White House, resigned in May 2017 in the midst of ongoing blowback for the president’s handling of the firing of James Comey.

Sean Spicer 
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned in late July 2017 when Trump hired Anthony Scaramucci as communications director. 
According to the New York Times, which first broke the news, Spicer told President Trump he vehemently disagreed with the appointment of New York financier and former Fox Business host Anthony Scaramucci as communications director.
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Reince Priebus  
Priebus was ousted from his position as White House Chief of Staff in July 2017, when Donald Trump hired General John Kelly to take his place. 
“I am pleased to inform you that I have just named General/Secretary John F Kelly as White House Chief of Staff. He is a Great American,” Trump said in a tweet. 
“I would like to thank Reince Priebus for his service and dedication to his country,” Trump went on to say in a separate tweet. “We accomplished a lot together and I am proud of him!”

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Anthony Scaramucci 
Scaramucci was the White House Communications Director for 10 days last summer and is now infamous for a wild, expletive-filled interview with The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza. He announced in late September week that he will launch his own media website, called The Scaramucci Post. 
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Sebastian Gorka 
Sebastian Gorka announced his decision to exit his role as deputy assistant to the POTUS in a letter to the president in late August 2017. 
“[G]iven recent events, it is clear to me that forces that do not support the MAGA promise are – for now – ascendant within the White House,” Gorka wrote in the letter, obtained by the Federalist. “As a result, the best and most effective way I can support you, Mr. President, is from outside the People’s House.”
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Steve Bannon 
White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon was reportedly fired in August 2017, though he insists he resigned July 27 — giving two weeks’ notice — but his leaving was put off because of the events in Charlottesville, Virginia. He returned to Breitbart News, where he vows to go to “war” for Trump.
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Tom Price 
Following a week-long scandal over his lavish use of private jets while traveling on government business, Health and Human Services secretary Tom Price  resigned on September 29.
“Secretary of Health and Human Services Thomas Price offered his resignation earlier today and the President accepted,” the White House said in a statement. “The President intends to designate Don J. Wright of Virginia to serve as Acting Secretary, effective at 11:59 p.m. on September 29, 2017.”
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Omarosa Manginault 
Former “Apprentice” contestant Omarosa Manigault Newman resigned in December “to pursue other opportunities,” according to a White House press release. Trump thanked her for In February 2018, she became a contestant on “Celebrity Big Brother,” and bashed Trump in the first episode. 
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Brenda Fitzgerald
Centers for Disease Control director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned in January 2018 after a Politico report that she bought shares in a tobacco company one month into her role. 
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Rob Porter  
Staff secretary Rob Porter left the White House in February 2018 after his two ex-wives both detailed accusations of  domestic abuse. Reports emerged that senior aides knew about the allegations for months but did nothing until more details came out to the public, sparking backlash. Trump praised Porter’s character and reiterated that he had proclaimed his innocence. 
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Three staffers have left in the last month

The turnover in the Trump administration continues.

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